Language Comma Aggressive Use Thereof

Last night, we went to see Studio Theatre’s production of The Mother with the Hat.  Except that’s not really the play’s title.  I try to keep this a family blog, though, so we’ll leave it at that. I’d seen the play before — in New York, with Chris Rock playing one of the leads.  I came away from that production feeling distinctly conflicted — Rock did a fine job moving about the stage, interpreting his...

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Super Secret Projects and Scarcity

Yesterday, I barely dipped my toe into the online world.  See, I was about 150 pages away from finishing my edits on my Super Secret Project, CROSSROADS.  (No, I can’t tell you about it.  That’s why it’s a Super Secret.  I *can* say that it’s a full novel, written on spec, for a teen audience.  It’s in a genre new to me, but one that I’ve read widely.  I really, really, really like the characters and the...

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The. End.

Those were the words that I typed last Friday, just as my official workday was scheduled to come to a close. The.  End. It’s always a pleasure to reach the end of a draft, to have that feeling that all of the story threads have been woven together, that the characters have completed their arcs, that the plot ends have been tucked in, nice and tight. Sometimes, it’s more of a pleasure than others. The draft I finished was for a novel...

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Too Derivative (Not!)

So, I’m writing this novel. And in this novel, my main character is reading Hamlet.  Shakespeare’s play is giving me a great chance for Main Character to think about duty and honor and revenge.  After a particular incident, she thinks, “We have a policy against [that] but it’s…” I wanted to say “observed more in the breach than…” but I couldn’t remember the rest of the proverb.  So I...

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Looking for a Love Poem

For my current WIP, I’m looking for a love poem.  Here are the requirements: Must be in the public domain. Must be somewhat obscure — nothing that is regularly anthologized in high school or college freshman lit classes — but see 3 below. Must be by generally recognizable author (e.g., Keats, Shelly, Byron, etc.) May be long, but a single stanza or two must be quotable, to get the feeling of the wild, romantic love expressed...

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